How to Make a Wood Bead Chandelier






WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

Hello Remodelaholics!  I am Tasha and I blog over at Designer Trapped in a Lawyer’s Body about thrifty DIY projects and home renovations.  You may remember my first contributor post about how to transform an outdated, cultured marble vanity with concrete and my post about how we built a beautiful wood screen to hide ugly utility boxes on the exterior of our house.  Well, I am back again this month to teach you how to make a wood bead chandelier.  It is a bit time consuming, but VERY easy and the result is stunning!

I don’t know about you, but I find that beautiful light fixtures can be outrageously expensive.  Fortunately, there are a lot of affordable DIY options for making light fixtures, like these 14 DIY pendant lights.  There are also clever and cost effective ways to update existing light fixtures, like these two easy ways to update flush mount fixtures.

I have fallen in love with wood bead chandeliers that are popular right now, but I have NOT fallen in love with the price tags.  So, I decided how to make my own DIY version and today I am going to show you how I did it!

How to Make Your Own Wood Bead Chandelier

Full written tutorial below; be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel to see more videos!

  This post contains affiliate links. See our full disclosure policy here

Materials Needed:

  • (1) 10 inch quilting hoop (from your local craft store or Amazon)
  • (2) 3 inch quilting hoops  (from your local craft store or Amazon)
  • Thin gauge wire
  • Wood glue
  • Super glue
  • Electrical tape
  • Scissors
  • Quilting thread
  • Quilting needle
  • Wood beads (the amount of beads you need depends a lot upon what size your chandelier will be).  I ordered mine online and spent around $40 for the beads.  I used the following:
    • Small beads- 8mm (like these).  I used approximately 600.
    • Medium beads- 14mm (like these).  I use approximately 400.
    • Large beads- 19 mm (these are just slightly larger).  I used approximately 75.
  • Mini pendant light kit (I used Portfolio Mini Pendant Fitter in oil-rubbed bronze finish, from Lowe’s Home Improvement; you can also find an inexpensive one on Amazon)

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

Steps for the top of the chandelier:

1)You will be working with a 3 inch and 10 inch hoop first.  Remove the outer hoops–for now, you will work only with the inner hoops.

2) Thread your quilting needle with quilting thread, being sure to double up and knot it at the end.

3) Loop the thread over the 3 inch quilting hoop.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

4) String your beads onto the thread.  The pattern is: 10 small beads followed by 1 medium bead/1 small bead x 12.  Finish each row with a medium bead, so that you have a total of 13 medium beads.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

5) Tie the end of your strand to the 10 inch quilting hoop with a double or triple knot.  BE SURE NOT TO ALLOW YOUR STRANDS TO CROSS OVER EACH OTHER.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

6) Repeat until the top of your chandelier is as full as you like.  Then cut away excess thread.  This is what your chandelier will look like at this stage.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

Steps for the bottom of the chandelier:

1) Grab your second 3 inch hoop and remove the outer hoop.

2) Thread your quilting needle with quilting thread, being sure to double up and knot it at the end.

3) Loop the thread over the 3 inch quilting hoop, just as you did above.

4) String the beads onto your thread using the following pattern: 1 small, 1 large.  Repeat the pattern for a total of 5 times.

5) Tie the end of your strand to the same 10 inch quilting hoop with a double or triple knot.  The 10 inch hoop will sit above the 3 inch hoop you are working with, which will serve as the bottom of the chandelier.  AGAIN, BE SURE NOT TO ALLOW YOUR STRANDS TO CROSS OVER EACH OTHER.  Below is a photo of how things will look at this stage–bear in mind, you will be working with it upside down at this point.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

6) Add as many strands as you like.

Final light assembly steps:

1) Add a drop of super glue to each knot.  This will help ensure that your knots do not come loose.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

2) Grab your OUTER hoops and paint some wood glue along the inside of each one.  Then, secure them in place over the inner loops, tightening them into place.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

3) After your wood glue has dried, remove the screw from each of the outer hoops.  Then use cutting snips to remove the part of the hardware that sticks out.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

Steps to attach the pendant light:

1) Use a small drill bit to drill two very small vertical holes along each side of the TOP hoop.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

2) Run wire through one hole and circle the wire around the cord of the pendant light.  Then thread the wire through the opposite hole.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

3) Wrap electrical tape below the circle of wire around your cord–this will ensure that the light does not slip down.  I covered my black electrical tape with some gold washi tape to make it less noticeable.  Be sure also to wrap secure the ends of your wire by wrapping them. This is what the top of your light will look like when you look down into it.

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

That’s it!  You are ready to hang your light up and admire your handy work!  Check out the finished chandelier.  We hung ours in our guest room to replace an outdated flush mount fixture.  We are in love with it!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

WOW! Come learn how to make your own wood bead chandelier with this awesome tutorial by Designer Trapped in a Lawyer's Body for Remodelaholic.com!

I would love for you to head over to my blog, Designer Trapped in a Lawyer’s Body, to check out our other inspiring DIY projects.  You would love our DIY bentwood pendant light tutorial!  And if your kitchen is outdated, be sure to check out how we painted our kitchen cabinets without priming or sanding {and they are holding up perfectly}!  Or if you prefer crafty projects, you won’t want to miss my DIY photo canvas tutorial–learn the secret to creating authentic canvas texture!  I hope to see you over in my corner of blog land soon!

bentwood pendant Kitchen-cabinets-after-1024x682 Photo canvas

———————————————

More DIY lighting ideas:

Easy Faux Copper Light Fixture

Lovely! Make your own faux copper light fixture from a basic glass shade @Remodelaholic

Terrarium into light fixture DIY tutorialDIY Geometric Terrarium Light by A Shade of Teal featured on Remodelaholic

DIY geometric hurricane pendant lightdiy himmeli hurricane pendant light

Crystal update for a “boob” light
Upgrade a standard builder grade flushmount ceiling light with crystals to look like a faceted Pottery Barn fixture

How to turn your vanity light strip into a hanging pendant chandelierDIY rustic mason jar and wood hanging chandelier pendant light - The Summery Umbrella featured on @Remodelaholic






The post How to Make a Wood Bead Chandelier appeared first on Remodelaholic.

This was posted on Linda Song’s Blog

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25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds






Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com

Window treatments are an easily changed feature in a home. Whether you’ve had blinds hanging in your home or move into a home and take down old blinds, don’t throw them out! There are so many great ways to repurpose old blinds. From home decor to light fixtures to headboards, these ideas will amaze you. Some don’t even look like blinds were used. Check out these 25 ways to repurpose old blinds for all over the home.

Creative Ways to Upcycle and Repurpose Old Blinds

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Rustic Industrial Letters by My Love 2 Create for Remodelaholic

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Old Blinds to Roman Shades by Posh Pieces for Remodelaholic

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Vertical Blinds to Drapes by Sassy Sanctuary for Remodelaholic

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Ombre Peacock Art by A Girl and a Glue Gun

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Marbling Art by Mom in Music City

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Wooden Blind Frame by Clover House

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Wooden Blind Frame by Domestic Imperfection

Don't throw away old blinds, reuse them. There are so many ways to use them around the home. Check out these 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds via Remodelaholic.com #oldblinds #upcycle #repurpose #blinds #diy

Love Banner by Life at the Cottages

See even MORE ways to reuse old blinds on the next page –>






The post 25 Ways to Repurpose Old Blinds appeared first on Remodelaholic.

This was posted on Linda Song’s Blog

Gorgeous 1920’s Cottage Master Bathroom Addition






When it comes to creating a home you love, some home just need some superficial help — paint, window coverings — while some need some more character from wainscoting or built-ins (my favorite!) — and then there are those that really just need a wall or two taken down. Our lovely guest today lives in a charming 1920’s cottage style home which has, unfortunately, been through a rather tragic 1950’s remodel. But Heidi and her husband are restoring its charm, room by room — and the first room they tackled was their master bathroom addition. They started out with NO bathroom, and they and their team created this beautiful luxurious master bathroom:
edit 1920s-cottage-with-added-dormer-for-master-bath-addition-My-Sweet-Cottage-featured-on-@Remodelaholic

from this cramped room, which started out as a closet and was renovated into a half bath.

2 1927 Cottage master bathroom demolition and renovation to add a dormer window, before 1, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

Isn’t it amazing? Read below for the full story from Heidi, and browse these other beautiful master baths for some inspiration:

click on each photo to go to the post

Master Bathroom Renovation in black and white with porcelain tile and a sliding mirror over the window @Remodelaholic elegant spacious master bath remodel - Golden Boys and Me via @Remodelaholic master bathroom remodel with marble

Give Heidi a warm Remodelaholic welcome!

Renovating a 1920's cottage and adding a dormer to turn a small closet into a beautiful spacious master bathroom

Before and After: 1920’s Cottage Master Bathroom Addition
by Heidi from My Sweet Cottage

Hello, Remodelaholic readers. My name is Heidi and my blog is My Sweet Cottage. My 1927 English cottage-style house is the inspiration and backdrop for my remodeling, decorating, and gardening posts. And my cottage is very sweet – it’s just far from perfect. Our living here is the result of what I can only attribute to temporary insanity. My husband Chris and I were not even thinking about moving when we impulsively decided to buy this house. And we are not impulsive people. In fact, we were in the process of planning a remodel for the house we lived in at the time. But all that flew out the window when this house came on the market. Emotion took over and though we could see that the house was far from perfect, we fell in love with it anyway.

But how did a sweet 1920s charmer get so imperfect? Three words: Unfortunate 1950s remodel. And sure, mid-century anything can be pretty wonderful – unless it involves stripping out a home’s original charm and forcing a character upon the home that is not authentic. Now while I can’t blame all of the house’s flaws on this poorly conceived 1950s remodel, I can blame most of them on it. The kitchen was the main victim. It was reduced to half its original size, with a strange wide hallway taking up the other half. So one of my favorite projects was our kitchen remodel where we restored the room to its original size. At the same time, we brought back the 1920s arched doorways that had been squared off in the 1950s remodel. These were fun and interesting projects and we learned so much about our house in the process.

Our Master Bath Remodel

Today Remodelaholic has asked me to talk about our master bath remodel. This project was also about reworking part of that 1950s remodel.

But to fully explain it, we will have to go back farther in time, back to when the house was built. The upstairs bedroom, the largest bedroom in the house, had a walk-in closet. The long and narrow closet was tucked under the sloping roofline, as closets often were in older homes.

Along comes the 1950s remodel. By simply adding some fixtures and plumbing, the closet is converted into a half bath. Not a horrible idea, really, just not easy to use because it is so narrow and the roofline cuts into the wall. And it’s nothing much to look at.

2 1927 Cottage master bathroom demolition and renovation to add a dormer window, before 1, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

1950s half bath, south wall

3 1927 Cottage master bathroom demolition and renovation to add a dormer window, before 2, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

1950s half bath, north wall, during demolition

Then Chris and I come along. I am keen to remodel the kitchen as our first big project, but Chris cannot stand the master half bath. Actually he can’t stand in it because he is tall and the roof slopes. And I am already a little burned out on having to go downstairs to our main bathroom to shower.

So we decided to create a master bathroom by adding a dormer to the half bath to gain some space.

4 Beautiflly remodeled dormer window bathroom, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

South Wall after remodel

Planning the Project

Since this project meant cutting a huge hole in the roof, we really wanted to get it right.

5 Add a dormer window for more space in a small bathroom, 1927 cottage remodel, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

So we took our time with the most important part: The planning process.

Of course a dormer would change the exterior appearance of the house. And since this dormer would be on the front side of the house, it had to look original. We started by researching the different types of dormers and taking photographs of 1920s houses that had dormers we liked. The type of dormer would also impact the amount of space we would have to work with.

We decided on a gabled dormer to match the dormer above our front porch and also to allow for a cathedral ceiling in the new bathroom.

After Chris crawled into the attic space to take measurements, he drew up a graph paper template of the entire upstairs area – the finished rooms and the unfinished, sloping attic space.

6 Hand-drawn plans for adding dormer window to existing 1920s cottage, by My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

We made a bunch of copies and we used the copies to sketch potential master bath configurations, tweaking and redrawing whenever one of us had a new idea. Just deciding on the scale of the project took time.

But when we could stand in the doorway of the little half bath and actually visualize the finished remodel, we knew it was time to hire an architect to draw up our plans.

7 Architectral plans for adding dormer window to 1920s cottage, by My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

My number one rule on big remodel projects is that I must be able to “see” the finished project in my mind before any work starts. If I can’t see it yet, it’s still too early.

8 Exterior drawing of 1920s cottage remodeled to include a dormer window as a master bath, by My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

This project would require many different skill sets. We knew we would be in over our heads if we attempted this as a DIY project so we interviewed several contractors and found one we liked.

Getting the Look We Wanted

It was easy for us to agree on the look we wanted for the new bathroom: It shouldn’t look new. It should blend with the original features of our old house. So no fads – nothing that would not stand the test of time.

We decided on:

  • Window and door moldings milled to match the moldings already in the house;
  • Beadboard wainscoting to balance the height of the cathedral ceiling;

9 Dormer window bathroom, 1920s cottage authentic remodel with claw foot tub, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Carrara marble flooring and countertops;

10 How to create a bathroom in a dormer window, 1920s cottage remodel using carrera marble, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Nickel plated, vintage inspired fixtures (most came from Restoration Hardware);

11 1920s cottage bathroom remodel includes period specific fixtures for authentic feel, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

12 how to keep the authentic feel when restoring an old home, vintage-inspired bath fixtures, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Subway tile in the shower stall to echo the subway tile in the downstairs main bathroom;

13 Subway tile in master bath of home with bathroom in do, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholicrmer window

  • Vintage-look lighting, including a crystal chandelier;

14 Crystal chandelier to add vintage feel to old home remodel, Lowe's Home Improvement, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Custom built-in cabinets for two awkward little spaces under the roofline: 1) A makeup desk and 2) A small linen closet (drawers are inset to match the house’s original built-in cabinetry);

15 Custom built-in cabinetry to use all the space in a dormer window remodel, make-up desk, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

16 Custom built-in linen closet to maximize space in a dormer window bathroom, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Glass knobs on cabinets and doors to match those already in the home;
  • Leaded glass for the windows in the new dormer to match the small original leaded glass pocket window and the other windows in the house;

17 Leaded glass window keeps the authentic feel when remodeling an old home, 1927 cottage, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • A clawfoot tub;

18 Claw-foot tub keeps with vintage feel of 1920 cottage remodel, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • Heated floors; and
  • Real stucco for the dormer exterior to match the original stucco siding.

19 Gabled Dormer added to old cottage, real stucco exterior, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

Cost Saving Measures

If all of this sounds expensive, that is because it was. Our contractor’s labor and materials came to around $50,000. But his crew did a wonderful job.

It could have been even more expensive, but we came up with a few little ways of saving money without compromising quality.

  • Chris did the demo work himself, saving us almost $1,000.
  • We hired our own electrician, one we had used before and who charged very reasonable rates.
  • We did the interior painting ourselves. (The blue is “Pale Sky” interior satin from Valspar’s American Tradition.)
  • We hunted down a vintage clawfoot tub at a salvage shop for a very reasonable price. The new clawfoot tubs we found, besides not really looking right, were much more expensive than vintage tubs.
  • We did not change the toilet location, eliminating some potential plumbing and drain work.
  • We had a local glass artist add the leading to the new windows after we received them Milgard. Ordering real leaded windows from Milgard or anywhere else would have cost a fortune. So strictly speaking our new windows are not leaded glass windows. They are windows with the leading placed over the glass. But they still convey the look we want.
  • We found a vanity at Pottery Barn that already had a sink and a Carrara marble countertop. It was on closeout for under $800.

20 Pottery Barn carrera marble sink in remodeled bathroom of 1920s home, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

  • We decorated using items we already had: An antique washstand (from Chris’s mother) and wash basin (from his grandmother), and blue leaded glass windows that I’d had in storage for years.

21 Antique washstand and wash basin complement 1920s cottage bathroom remodel, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

The Results

I would stay in this bathroom all day if I could. We didn’t have a usable east facing window upstairs before this remodel, so the window is actually my favorite feature. I love the natural light and the sunrises.

22 Added dormer window creates beautifully usable bathroom in 1927 home, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

Beautiful master bathroom in a classic 1920's cottage. They added a dormer to turn this closet turned tiny half bath into the real deal and it is GORGEOUS!

23 Dormer addition to 1920s cottage adds light, space and beauty, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

24 Bathroom in dormer window increases functionality and charm of 1920s cottage, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

25 Vintage feel preserved in bathroom remodel of 1920s cottage, My Sweet Cottage featured on @Remodelaholic

Thank you, Remodelaholic, for having me share this project!

Product Sources

  • Hardware and fixtures: most came from Restoration Hardware.
  • Curtains: World Market. Sorry that I don’t recall the pattern name.
  • Chandelier: Spanish made, special ordered from Lowe’s.
  • Woven stool: actually a basket turned upside-down. I got it from Ross for about $12!
  • Vanity with marble top: Pottery Barn clearance
  • Paint color: “Pale Sky” interior satin from Valspar’s American Tradition

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Heidi, your bathroom and your home are beautiful! Thank you so much for sharing with us!

Remodelaholics, be sure to pop over to visit Heidi at My Sweet Cottage to see more of her home, like her lovely kitchen, and her smart DIYs, like this faux rustic barn light.

1920's cottage kitchen renovation My Sweet Cottage






The post Gorgeous 1920’s Cottage Master Bathroom Addition appeared first on Remodelaholic.

This was posted on Linda Song’s Blog

Build a DIY Bike Rack Tutorial






Reclaim a corner of your garage with this DIY bike rack to keep all the wheeled toys in line and organized! Tutorial and building plan from The Heathered Nest on Remodelaholic.com

I finally have my garage. Dave, the male half of The Heathered Nest here. I gotta say, as a guy, whether we really need one or not, a garage is something that tops our “wishlist” when looking for a home. And although my wife and I have moved A LOT since first being married, we had never had a house with a garage. So when I finally got the garage, there was a brief moment of, “WOW, this is great!” But what they say is true. The more space you have, the more you’ll just fill that space with junk. The garage turned into a catch all. Lawn equipment, college text books, junked up furniture, or “treasures” my wife finds by the roadside…ALL OF IT, and more, was in our garage. When we looked around and realized that the garage could have been the star of one of those episodes of “storage wars”, we finally broke. We started purging. And then it was time to organize.

One of the items we struggled with were the kids’ ride on toys…bikes, scooters, etc. I found myself constantly tripping over them or kicking them out of the way…so I wanted to create a permanent home for those bikes. So I built this DIY rack out of some 2×4’s, and the kids love this thing. They now have their own, personal, VIP parking spots. A claimed stake to a little parcel of land they can call their own. We’ll show you how to design and build your own bike rack. Ours was made for 3 bikes, but you can adjust yours to fit more or less. As I was building this, I figured out that there was some extra storage space created that was a built-in bonus! Keep reading to find out…

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

This post contains affiliate links. For more details, see our full disclosure policy here

How to Build a DIY Bike Rack

Full written tutorial below the video. Can’t see the video? Click here — and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel to see all our new videos!

Supplies

  • 2×4’s…you will need seven 8’ long 2×4’s
  • 2-1/2” Screws
  • Tape measure
  • Rafter square (or something that measures a 45 degree angle)
  • Screw gun
  • Chop saw or circular saw
  • Kreg Jig

How To:

1. Plan, plan, plan…

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Trust me, this will make everything go smoother. Lay out the bikes (we will be working with three in this tutorial) to see how much space is needed, as a whole. When I was planning, I wanted it to be easy for the kids to get their bikes in and out without the handle bars hitting each other. I found that I needed about 24” between each bike. So I sketched this out, and for the three bikes in total, I came up with an overall rack length of 58”.

2. Make space in your garage/shed/wherever this will live…

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

The overall size of your rack may need to be adjusted depending on the space you have to dedicate. 

3. Determine the required DEPTH.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

This was a trial and error process, but I came up with an overall depth of 19” (this is the outside dimension of the whole rack from front to back, including the width of the 2×4’s in the frame).  My sons bike has a tire diameter of 20”, so if your kids bikes have the same tire dimension, you should be fine. But if your tires are larger, you may need to increase the depth of your bike rack.

4. Build the base.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

The base will be composed of 4 pieces of 2×4, 2 long (58″ each), and 2 short (12″ each). Cut these pieces using the chop saw. Once cut, lay your four pieces out on a flat surface. Then screw the four pieces together.  I used the Kreg jig to make pocket holes in the 12″ pieces.  We have mentioned the Kreg Jig in other posts…great tool. and I definitely recommend it. We use it a few times in this project.  Once these are screwed together the overall outside frame dimensions should be 58″x19″.

5. Create pocket on base to hold tire.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Based on the width of the tire, I decided to make the pocket 3” wide. This pocket will hold the front bike tire. To make this pocket, you will need to cut an additional 4 pieces of 2×4, each 12″ long. Once cut, use the Kreg Jig to make pocket holes in each of these 12″ pieces.  Then screw them into the frame. Your base is done!

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Above is a shot of the BOTTOM of the completed base. Flip the base over, and we will continue by adding the upright sections.

6. Cut upright/angled sections.

The angled pieces are probably the trickiest part of this project. But don’t worry…I’ve done all the math for you. Even broke out the Pythagorean theorem…remember that from high school? We now need to build the upright sections of the bike rack that will hold the front tires. This will be constructed of 2 angled 2×4’s for each bike housing. In this scenario, we need room for three bikes, so we will be cutting 6 of these pieces. These are installed at a 45 degree angle, so use a rafter square to measure your 45 degree angle on one end of your first 2×4. 

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Then, cut along your mark using the chop saw.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Once you have cut the end at 45 degrees, measure 22″ on the LONG side and cut another 45 degree angle.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Now you have to cut the second piece (the rear/vertical upright).  Measure 15.5″ and then cut a 45 degree angle on this board, again using the rafter square. 

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

For this second piece you will also want to use the Kreg Jig to and put two pocket holes at the base of this board…this will allow you to easily attach it to the base.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Now you need to screw these two pieces that form the upright section together. 

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Set this section up on your base and screw the vertical upright to the rear of the base, as shown below.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Then screw the slanted portion of the upright to the front of the base, shown below.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Now repeat this 5 more times, for the remaining upright sections.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

When all 6 uprights are attached, your structure will appear as above.  

(Quick note…if your bike rack is a different depth than mine, you can’t use the same measurements I used.  You would need to cut the first 45 degree angle, hold this piece on the base and measure from the base up to this piece to get the length you want and then cut your second 45 degree angle…as shown in the image below).  

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

7. Bracing.

The hardest part is complete. Now all we have to do is add a little bracing to make the structure stable. First, we add 2×4’s to the back of each of the vertical supports in the rear of the rack. 

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Remember, you need to add 1.5″ to the length of these supports to account for the height of the base 2×4…so these are 17″ long (15.5″ + 1.5″ = 17″).

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Place one of these 17″ vertical 2×4’s behind each upright angle supports, 6 in total.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Now add a 2×4, (58″ in length) on top to tie it all together.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Screw the top 2×4 in place.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Your bike rack is now complete…and your garage is one more step closer to actually being used for what it was intended…to hold a car!!

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Go ahead and park those bikes!

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

DIY-bike-rack-tutorial-remodelaholic-heathered-nest-2

8. Bonus!

Now for the bonus storage!! As if building this bike rack was not reward enough…wait! There’s more! Many kids have these “plasma cars” and those things are a pain to store too! Just plain dumb luck, but this bike rack offers a great place to store the plasma cars with no extra modification! I simply took the plasma car and stood it up on the rear wheels, placing it in the gap between the bikes…voila…instant plasma car storage. I was pretty happy with that. Told my wife I planned it that way, too.

Easy DIY bike rack tutorial to organize your garage NOW! Remodelaholic.com via heatherednest.com

DIY-bike-rack-tutorial-remodelaholic-heathered-nest-1

I hope you found this tutorial helpful! Come see us at the Nest sometime soon. We love to DIY. Here are a couple of our favorite projects, check them out!

heathered nest kids vintage transportation bath door heathered-nest-urban-country-guest-room-bedroom-with-barnboard-ceiling DIY Dollar Store Bandana Pillows from Heathered Nest

Our $1800 Kids Bath Remodel

Our Modern Country Guest Room Remodel

Dollar Store Bandana Pillows

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More tips and tutorials for an organized garage:

Build a pegboard wall tool organizer and workbench

DIY tutorial to build a workbench and pegboard tool cabinet with sliding doors, featured on Remodelaholic.com

10 tips for an organized garagespruce up your workspace - organized garages and sheds at remodelaholic.com

6 ways to organize and spruce up your garageGet This Look - Simple Tips for Garage Organizing from Remodelaholic

Amazing DIY garage door makeoversDIY Garage Door Makeovers @Remodelaholic

13 ways to hide outdoor eyesoresways to hide outdoor eyesores






The post Build a DIY Bike Rack Tutorial appeared first on Remodelaholic.

This was posted on Linda Song’s Blog

With Just a Few Supplies, Make This DIY Doily Lantern For Your Home

ou might think of doilies are old fashioned and outdated but they can be quite decorative and romantic when you use them with a modern twist- like this one. Lamps are one of my favorite home pieces and what better way to highlight those unique lace patterns in a lamp! Let’s make Doily Lanterns!

For this DIY, you will need doilies, a balloon, petroleum jelly, Elmer’s glue, water, flour, and a light kit. You will also need the following tools a mixing bowl, paint brush, mixing spoon, measuring spoon, straight pin, and scissors.

Sarah from Socraftastic starts off by blowing up the balloon and securing it. After she adds a thin layer of petroleum jelly to the balloon to ensure the doily does not stick, and sets it aside. Next in a bowl, she mixes Elmer’s glue, 1 tablespoon of flour, and two tablespoons of water.

She then places the doily on the top of the balloon centering it in the middle. She applies a layer of the glue mixture to the doily. She continues adding more doilies painting them on until the entire balloon is covered. She then allows the balloon to dry thoroughly.

Amazingly, she pops the balloon and the doilies stay in place. She inserts the light bulb and flips the switch.

I am truly amazed by this craft. Isn’t it gorgeous?

 

Full Article : http://www.jumblejoy.com/diy-dolly-lantern

Related Article : http://www.ourlittlebeehive.com/